Articles Posted in Resources for Seniors and Caregivers

 

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We are free-wheeling and in control of our lives. We want to keep moving the ball down the field. We like to solve a problem and then move on to the next.

But our command and control attitude toward decision-making often comes into conflict with our loved one’s way of looking at things. We cajole, we coax, we coerce, but the more we press, the greater the resistance.

Consider some of the typical issues we think of as critical to our loved one’s safety and well-being: Continue reading

AdobeStock_78991469-300x190All major life transitions require preparation and adaptation. Graduation, moving into your first apartment, landing your first job, getting married, having kids, changing careers, retiring — each of these life events typically comes with a lot of planning. Becoming a caregiver for an aging parent, however, is an event that takes many people by surprise.

Sometimes, there’s a sudden health crisis like a stroke or a deteriorating chronic condition. Other times, the turning point is a long time coming, but is obscured by denial.

Many of the 65 million Americans who provide care for a loved one wish they could go back and take more time to prepare. They wish they had known which questions to ask, which steps to take, and how to best assess the situation so that they could guarantee the best quality of life for their parents and themselves.

AdobeStock_97517221-300x200By Claudia Englisby

Connecticut’s protections against elder abuse have recently become stronger than ever. As an elder advocate, this makes me proud.

In our profession, we hear stories all the time like this one, told to me recently by a client of our firm:

My mother’s caregiver was only too happy to make trips to the local supermarket to pick up groceries anytime Mom was out of something. No milk? No problem. Running low on fruit? I’ll run right out and get some. Continue reading

Home DecoratingBy Melinda Otlowski, Accessible Design Consultants

You, like most Americans, probably hope to lead an independent and active life in your own home for as long as possible.

According to the AARP, 85 percent of those older than 50 desire to grow old in their own homes. This common desire is rooted in our deep-seated human needs for comfort, security, independence and identity. Not only does “aging in place” answer fundamental emotional needs, it also makes financial sense.

Staying in your home, even with the help of a caregiver or home aide, is typically
more economical than moving to an assisted living facility or nursing home. Continue reading

Driving CarHave you ever thought it might be nice to make a little extra money to supplement your retirement?

Maybe you need a bit more income just to make ends meet, or maybe you’re doing okay but wouldn’t mind having some room in your budget for nice-to-have treats like a special night out or a weekend away.

Many digital-savvy seniors have found fun and creative ways to earn this kind of additional money as participants in the sharing economy. Continue reading

The mechanical arm and a butterfly.

You may not be ready for a robot caregiver – believe it or not they exist – but a growing number of technologies are available today to help older adults maintain their health, manage chronic conditions, and live safely and successfully in their own homes.

This is great news!

Because if you’re like most people, you’d rather stay put and never have to call a nursing home “home.” Technology tools also make life a little easier for family caregivers, trying to keep all the balls in the air.

So what can technology do to lighten the load? Continue reading

summer fun

If you use a wheelchair, there’s a lot to do in Connecticut, especially during our way-too-short summer. Whether you love the beach or the woods, there are many great venues to sample.

We did some research and selected some special places for you to check out.

Take a Hike

Rails-to-Trails Conservancy lists wheelchair-accessible trails in Connecticut. Here are user-reviewed five star-rated trails:

Continue reading

downsizing

“Downsizing” is one of those words that seems simple, but can be wrought with overwhelming and emotional baggage. While it’s easy to embrace the concept – a smaller space, fewer possessions – actually getting rid of stuff is often harder than expected.

This shouldn’t really come as a surprise since we spend most of our lives accumulating “stuff.”

Year after year, we buy and collect, receive gifts, and save mementos, and it slowly fills up every drawer, shelf, attic space, closet, and corner of the garage. And then, in the course of a few weeks or months, we’re faced with undoing decades’ worth of acquiring.

It’s not easy. Continue reading

man-listeningGood news!  You can now take a hearing test over the phone.

That’s right, the National Institute of Health has provided a grant to support this easy test that you can take in the privacy of your home.

Why should you consider taking the test? Read on…

No one wants to admit they’re losing their hearing, but according to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) hearing loss is a reality for more than a third of people age 65 to 74, and more than half of those over the age of 75.

These numbers make it one of the most prevalent health issues for older Americans. Only arthritis and heart disease affect more seniors. Continue reading

Older Americans ProtectionIt’s been 10 years since the Older Americans Act was last reauthorized by Congress, but as of last week, the Older Americans Act Reauthorization Act of 2016 was signed into law by President Obama.

The Older Americans Act (OAA) originally passed in 1965, the same year Medicare and Medicaid were added to the Social Security Act. It was a banner year for older Americans, establishing funding for needed medical care and social services. Continue reading

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