Dollarphotoclub_88177383-300x300Advocating for Connecticut residents and helping them plan for the future is what we do. And when we feel it’s necessary to bump up our resources to accommodate our residents in the best possible way, we take the steps to do so.

For the New Year, we are pleased to announce lots of exciting news:

As of January 1st, we have a new principal, a new name, a new partner and four new attorneys. And we have opened an office in Madison, a second office in Berlin and expanded our Simsbury office.

brain-300x261Just as keeping physically fit is important as we age, so is keeping mentally fit. More research is being done on how adults can work out their “mental muscles” to keep their minds sharp and possibly put off or avoid the onset Alzheimer’s and dementia.

1. Engage in physical exercise

Surprised that physical exercise tops the list? You shouldn’t be. Exercise is arguably the single most effective way to keep the mind sharp and the memory strong. Any type of physical exercise that gets the heart rate up is good for the brain as well as the body.

By Colleen E. Masse

You did it! You made it to 18 and now your child is an…ADULT?!

Yes, that’s right, your little bundle of joy is all grown up and your work is done, or is it? Here are some things to consider as your child reaches the age of majority.

AdobeStock_142240831-300x200It may seem odd to ask young parents to think about estate planning, but starting a family is actually the perfect reason to address some really important questions. After all, becoming a parent isn’t just about choosing names and picking out nursery colors. It’s about being wholly responsible for someone else—a child—for life.

While it’s difficult to even contemplate the unthinkable, it’s imperative that new parents plan for every possibility to ensure that their children are protected, cared for, and financially secure.

Since it may be a while since you traveled this road, here is an overview of the estate planning details young parents should address.

Dollarphotoclub_88177383-300x300By Colleen E. Masse

As everyone knows, Connecticut had quite a year with its budget.

If you qualify for one of the Medicare Savings Programs – Qualified Medicare Beneficiary, Specified Low-Income Medicare Beneficiary, or Additional Low-Income Medicare Beneficiary – this budget will affect you.

SocialSecurityWhat happens to your husband’s or wife’s Social Security benefits if he or she dies? Are you entitled to them as the surviving spouse?

In general, yes.

If your spouse who has passed had paid into Social Security long enough, you may be eligible to collect his or her benefits. These are known as Survivors Benefits.

AdobeStock_113836857-300x200It’s so confusing! HIPAA, Health Care Directives, Powers of Attorney. How does one differ from the others?

A HIPAA Authorization, a Health Care Directive, and a Health Care Power of Attorney can easily be confused because all three have to do with your permission about your medical care and medical information.

Plus, both health care directives (aka living wills) and health care powers of attorney are known as “advance directives,” which only adds to the confusion.

The point of having an estate plan is to define your wishes about what happens to your money and property after you die. But an outdated estate plan can ruin those plans – in ways you may not be aware of.

What can happen if you don’t review and update your estate plan?

Here are the top three consequences of dying with an outdated estate plan and examples of how they can happen.

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