Medicaid Planning

Medicaid planning is done to protect assets from the high cost of long term care expenses and nursing home care. Although you or your loved one’s health is good now, you'd be wise to get your house in order before things change. 

The sooner you start Medicaid planning, the more assets you can protect!

With a carefully designed and thorough Medicaid plan you can ensure a secure future for your spouse and a legacy for your children.

What is Medicaid?

Medicaid, also called Title 19, is a government program for people who are over 65 and for individuals with disabilities. It can pay for some or all of the in-home, assisted living and nursing home care that Medicare doesn’t cover. 

But there are specific rules of eligibility which make it important for you not only start planning early, but also to make certain the plan is done correctly.

Contact us today if you're even thinking about protecting your money and property from the costs of care. Medicaid planning on your own, or with someone who is not a qualified elder law attorney, could result in your losing the assets you tried so hard to protect.

Or, if you're at the point where you need to apply for Medicaid, we can actually do the application for you. We have a team of highly experienced staff who focus solely on Medicaid applications. They have an impressive track record and would be happy to take it off your hands. Click here to learn about using lawyers vs. non-lawyers.

Medicaid eligibility rules cannot be neatly summarized and the rules differ depending upon whether you are married or single.

If you are married, the rules provide for some basic asset protection for the healthy spouse, including a house, car and a minimum amount of money. There is also an income protection for the healthy spouse that can be as high as $2,898 per month.

Take a look at other important information you should know about Medicaid in Connecticut:

And to learn more about Medicaid, check out these blog posts:

How to Qualify for Medicaid Benefits by Planning Now

Be Careful: Transferring Assets to Qualify for Medicaid in Connecticut May Backfire

Paying Your Family to Care for You May Not Impact Your Medicaid Eligibility

4 Medicaid Catastrophes You Can Avoid

FREE REPORT: Applying for Medicaid? 5 Things You Should
Know